Blow Up

Postby WolfFur on Sat Jan 04, 2003 8:19 am

Back to the topic of the thread, and apologies for joining it so late:

Blow Up is considered by some film critics to be a signature film in the growth of the suspense movie, despite its occasionally pointless sideplots. It was, in fact, nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Director, and Best Original Screenply. If you've ever seen Mel Brook's HIGH ANXIETY, Blow-Up is spoofed as evidence of a North-by-Northwest style murder is found on a print about 3 meters on a side. (10 feet, for my fellow Yankees.)

Also, check out this review of Austin Powers (the first, and in my opinion the best one) by Roger Ebert:

"The movie, written by Myers and directed by Jay Roach, is smart enough to know the 1960s are funny without being exaggerated. In one sequence, a fashion photographer shoots '60s fashions, and the clothes, which look like outlandish science-fiction fantasies, are in fact identical to costumes worn during posing sessions in Antonioni's ``Blow Up'' (1967)."

http://www.suntimes.com/ebert/ebert_rev ... 50201.html
User avatar
WolfFur
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: New Castle, Pennsylvania

Postby Mako on Sat Jan 04, 2003 12:44 pm

WolfFur wrote:Back to the topic of the thread, and apologies for joining it so late:

Blow Up is considered by some film critics to be a signature film in the growth of the suspense movie, despite its occasionally pointless sideplots.


Interesting to lean more of the history of that film. The outright blatant misogynist elements were so offensive to the point I pulled the plug on the flick despite my realizing that AF was also quoting from the film.

It's stunning to me to learn that the film was up for an Academy award. I hope that today's attitudes towards women would bar any similar film from similar consideration. The film has not stood the test of time in my opinion.

This all is coming from a guy that walked out on Something About Mary, so take my ranting with the appropriate amount of sodium chloride ;)

CYa!
Mako
User avatar
Mako
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 617
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: Couch Surfing USA

Postby Tek Roo on Sun Jan 05, 2003 4:06 am

Mako wrote:This all is coming from a guy that walked out on Something About Mary, so take my ranting with the appropriate amount of sodium chloride ;)


Oh my... that movie... ::shudder::

I thought I was the only one on the planet that was appalled by that one...
Image <--- Temporary Avatar (I was feeling naked because you couldn't see my clothes)
User avatar
Tek Roo
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2002 4:00 pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Postby Mako on Sun Jan 05, 2003 12:41 pm

Tek Roo wrote:
Mako wrote:This all is coming from a guy that walked out on Something About Mary, so take my ranting with the appropriate amount of sodium chloride ;)


Oh my... that movie... ::shudder::

I thought I was the only one on the planet that was appalled by that one...


Ohhh, (massive rant omitted for brevity) That flick was terrible, which meant of course it was immensly popular.

Good to know I'm not alone in my distaste for that horrible movie :)

Tnx!
Mako
User avatar
Mako
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 617
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: Couch Surfing USA

Postby WolfFur on Sun Jan 05, 2003 3:19 pm

Mako wrote:
Good to know I'm not alone in my distaste for that horrible movie :)



Ditto. So much popular comedy today results from the slapstick antics of immature, selfish people. At least Blow Up was largely about the self-inflicted ANGST of an immature, selfish person. And it had a plotline.

I'm not a fan of nearly any sitcom on television these days. Seinfeld actually makes me angry when I watch it. Friends I can barely sit through. Older television comedy, like I Love Lucy, was far more enjoyable... because you DID love Lucy.

Another movie I can't stand...? Meeting the Parents. Great comedic timing, hilarious situations... and yet I can't enjoy them because I don't like the characters.

Why is it that popular culture these days seems to PREFER movies and shows about assholes?

'Scuse me for ranting.
User avatar
WolfFur
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: New Castle, Pennsylvania

Postby Mako on Sun Jan 05, 2003 3:45 pm

WolfFur wrote:
Mako wrote:
Good to know I'm not alone in my distaste for that horrible movie :)


Why is it that popular culture these days seems to PREFER movies and shows about assholes?

'Scuse me for ranting.


Rants are good for the soul ;-)

American Beauty also flirted, but didn't cross, the line. The acting and characters saved the day despite a few SAMish scenes. In the end I liked the flick.

Not that any of this has diddley to do with AF anymore though :)

CYa!
Mako
User avatar
Mako
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 617
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: Couch Surfing USA

Postby JimRob on Mon Jan 06, 2003 1:00 pm

I watched (though under some coercion - the alternative was standing outside) Something About Mary and I didn't find it all that bad. I didn't enjoy it very much either, though... I wasn't put off by the crudeness, I just found that the comedy it was meant to convey just missed me. American Pie suffered similarly (though perhaps less so).

On the whole I don't think it matters if comedy entirely lacks sympathetic characters, as long as the writers are aware of it; indeed, a comedy without enough nastiness becomes very dry. It is , however, a problem if you're expected to sympathise with someone who strikes you as an git.

'Cultural phasing syndrome' might be the term for it; when you gradually slide away from the values the media expects you to have and find yourself irritated by increasing proportions of what you see...
JimRob
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 321
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 1999 4:00 pm
Location: Int. Night.

Previous

 

Return to Albion Fuzz



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests