You read for fun?!

The place where no good punk-asses and aimless hipsters come to discuss a rather lousy comic.

Postby Man in a suit on Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:22 pm

Ibsen is fairly well known over here, at least in the theatre community. I seem to remember his work having a rather prominent place along with Chekhov and Shaw in the foundation of modern theatre.
Hooray for college.

Kefka, er, Kafka can be a bit of a downer. Gogol can be a laugh riot. More recently, China Mieville is interesting stuff if you're not afraid of a book that might have a fantasy/sci-fi sticker on the spine. Non-fiction wise, Guns Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond is quite interesting if a little dry at times. The World Is Flat by Thomas Friedman alternates between forebodding and optimistic, and doesn't seem like it should be such a big revelation.

I shut up now.
"And now to unleash screaming temporal doom!"
-Zim
User avatar
Man in a suit
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:08 pm
Location: Racoon City

Postby Yeahduff on Fri Dec 01, 2006 11:50 pm

Kinda sad that the extent of my Gogol knowledge comes from a gypsy punk band named after him, I think. They're a cool band, though.

I just finished In the Penal Colony by Kafka. This guy's fucking amazing. The special blend of doom and madness makes for delightful reading for the commute to work. I think I need an apparatus.

Tell me about Guns, Germs, and Steel.

And I'll entertain no further insinuation that this place is too smart for you. Dumbass.
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby Man in a suit on Mon Dec 04, 2006 5:48 pm

Guns, Germs and Steel, to oversimplify grossly, sets out to show that differing rates of technological advancement in various civilizations was due to the presence of resources and the length of time an area had been settled rather than some sort of inherent racial superiority. The book can get a little repetitive, and the fact that Diamond has to constantly reassert that notions of racial superiority are absurd is saddening, but other than that, quite a fascinating book. I do recommend it.
"And now to unleash screaming temporal doom!"
-Zim
User avatar
Man in a suit
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:08 pm
Location: Racoon City

Postby Nanda on Mon Jan 22, 2007 7:01 pm

I just finished a pretty interesting book called Like Rolling Uphill: Realizing the Honesty of Atheism by Dianna Narciso. It's rare to find a personal account like this from an average person (ie, someone who is not necessarily a professional or an intellectual) in regards to atheism, and for that reason, I liked it very much.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby Orphevs on Mon Jan 22, 2007 10:28 pm

I am currently reading "Pogonomyrmex Harverster Ants" by Cole (the definitive book on the genus) and "The World of Harverster Ants" by Taber. Boo Bio research projects. However, to keep myself sane while getting through those I started "Something Wicked this Way Comes" by Bradbury. Bradbury is Godly. Probably my favorite writer of prose, Bradbury. I don't think anything could match up to Fahrenheit 451, but I've read the first part of Something Wicked and it seems like a good late night home alone book to give you a coupla chills. If nothing else it reminds me of simpler times (I must have watched the Disney movie based off the book at least 10 times over the course of my childhood) and that's a pretty good feeling for a book to give ya.
- Vik
Orphevs
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 140
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:30 pm

Postby Yeahduff on Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:06 am

Fahrenheit 451 rocked my world when I read it in high school. I wonder what I'd think of it now.

Nanda wrote:I just finished a pretty interesting book called Like Rolling Uphill: Realizing the Honesty of Atheism by Dianna Narciso. It's rare to find a personal account like this from an average person (ie, someone who is not necessarily a professional or an intellectual) in regards to atheism, and for that reason, I liked it very much.


Good to know there's stuff out there like that to counter such bullshit as "The God Delusion."

I'm currently reading Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid On Earth by Chris Ware. I'm actually surprised that I'm not all that into it. I like other stuff of his, but I'm not really connecting with this.
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby Nanda on Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:15 am

yeahduff wrote:Good to know there's stuff out there like that to counter such bullshit as "The God Delusion."


I really don't care for Dawkins. He seems too full of himself. Though as an atheist, I have to agree with his basic principles; just not the way he goes about toting them.

yeahduff wrote:I'm currently reading Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid On Earth by Chris Ware.


That one made me cry. But then, honestly, it doesn't take all that much these days.


Now that I've finished Like Rolling Uphill, I've gotten into Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife, by Mary Roach (the author of Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers, which, btw, is excellent). So far so good.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby Yeahduff on Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:38 am

Nanda wrote:
yeahduff wrote:Good to know there's stuff out there like that to counter such bullshit as "The God Delusion."


I really don't care for Dawkins. He seems too full of himself. Though as an atheist, I have to agree with his basic principles; just not the way he goes about toting them.


It's the arrogance I find offensive. I forget if it was him or that other guy who said that tolerance of religion was a bad thing, which basically puts him up there as the Pat Robertson of atheism.

Nanda wrote:
yeahduff wrote:I'm currently reading Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid On Earth by Chris Ware.


That one made me cry. But then, honestly, it doesn't take all that much these days.


I'm only halfway through it, so maybe I should reserve judgement until I finish it.
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby Nanda on Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:04 pm

yeahduff wrote:It's the arrogance I find offensive. I forget if it was him or that other guy who said that tolerance of religion was a bad thing, which basically puts him up there as the Pat Robertson of atheism.


I couldn't agree more. Intolerance of anyone's held beliefs is never acceptable. Intolerant atheism is as bad as any religious fanaticism, and only further hurts our cause.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby Freddie Freelance on Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:36 pm

yeahduff wrote:I just finished In the Penal Colony by Kafka. This guy's fucking amazing. The special blend of doom and madness makes for delightful reading for the commute to work. I think I need an apparatus.

I Think I Need an Apparatus may be the name of my new band. 8-)

Lessee, I just finished Variable Star by Spider Robinson & Robert A. Heinlein, Cetaganda by Lois McMaster Bujold, and I'm in the middle of The Legions of Space by Kieth Laumer. That's the past 2 weeks worth of reading, I don't read as much as I used to.
Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., D.F.S.
User avatar
Freddie Freelance
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2006 12:55 pm
Location: San Diego

Postby Yeahduff on Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:03 pm

Yeah, wow, you'd better pick up the pace or we might not let you post here anymore.

Is I Think I Need an Apparatus a hardcore band, or proggish anti-rock?
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby Nanda on Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:41 pm

Finished Spook and have moved back to fiction. Re-reading Flannery O'Conner's A Good Man in Hard to Find and other short stories. It's been a few years since I read these stories. I remember really liking them at the time, but now I really wish I had classmates to discuss them with. College is wasted on students.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby PortableNuke on Thu Jan 25, 2007 1:04 am

yeahduff wrote:Is "I Think I Need an Apparatus" a hardcore band, or proggish anti-rock?


Emo/screamo/hxc band :D

I think Fahrenheit 451 would hold up pretty well. It's not as revered, or referenced, as 1984
User avatar
PortableNuke
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 989
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Under Control!

Postby Yeahduff on Mon Jul 30, 2007 8:49 am

Just read The Watchmen. What a fucked-up book.
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby Nanda on Mon Jul 30, 2007 1:56 pm

I just read "Flowers for Algernon" for the first time. They weren't kidding, it really was sad.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby Yeahduff on Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:08 am

Been years since I've read that. Yeah, they kept making us read that in jr high, high school, and it was like "you trying to make us kill ourselves here?" Who wrote that, by the way?
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

Postby PortableNuke on Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:19 pm

I thought it was Steinbeck, but apparently it's Daniel Keyes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Keyes

It's almost as scarring as finding When the Wind Blows as a kid.

http://www.amazon.com/When-Wind-Blows-Raymond-Briggs/dp/customer-reviews/0140094199
User avatar
PortableNuke
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 989
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Under Control!

Postby Nanda on Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:32 pm

Today I went to the library and found The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane while browsing the children's section. I'd seen the cover several times at Barnes & Noble and been intrigued, so I picked it up.

After reading it (took about an hour) I've concluded that there needs to be a movie made of The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. However, if they make this movie, I won't be able to see it, because I'll get sick from crying too much and have to leave the theatre.
Image Image
User avatar
Nanda
Cartoon Hero
 
Posts: 4268
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 9:06 am
Location: Peeking out of the closet.

Postby PortableNuke on Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:41 pm

That looks really good. I may pick it up.
User avatar
PortableNuke
Regular Poster
 
Posts: 989
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Under Control!

Postby Yeahduff on Thu Aug 02, 2007 7:51 am

Well that's an endorsement. I'll keep an eye out.
Image
I won't be the stars in your dark night.
User avatar
Yeahduff
Resident Stoic (Moderator)
 
Posts: 9092
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2003 4:16 pm
Location: I jumped into your grave and died.

PreviousNext

 

Return to Eight to One



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest