Why do you read The End of Things?

The happening place to be. Unless you go somewhere else that's more stimulating.
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TheSuburbanLetdown
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Why do you read The End of Things?

Post by TheSuburbanLetdown »

Somtimes I wonder, why do any of you people read this comic? As in, what do you find good about it and what should I keep doing? What sucks about it and can be made better? Sometimes I don't even know why I keep drawing it.
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Yeahduff
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Post by Yeahduff »

I'm obligated out of "friendship."

Actually, it's strong character study. The way everyone plays off each other, how self-defeating they are, the many neuorses of Evan Li (potential title, there), the strong art. It's not really about what's happening so much as why and how these people are reacting to it.
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Bloodied Fox
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Post by Bloodied Fox »

Well, I started reading it because I knew you from the Jack forum, decided you seemed like a nice guy and so was intrigued by what a comic you'd done would be like. I stayed because it was, and remains, quietly funny and consistently well drawn. It's also got a fun forum.
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Paul Escobar
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Post by Paul Escobar »

Like yeahduff said, strong characters and the way they interact make for a very attractive and addictive read. The characters are endearingly dysfunctional yet come off as very "real" people. That alone is quite an achievement.

Also, I like your art. There are sometimes some very minor issues with the characters' anatomy, but nothing that disturbs the reading. Your backgrounds and frame and page compositions are flawless and highly impressive. A lot of work went into these pages (three-point perspective hooray!), and it shows.

And you damn well better keep drawing this comic at least until the current storyline is finished!

Seriously though, apart from the aforementioned occasional minor anatomy issues, I have zero complaints. You're very good at this game and I hope you keep doing it. Because I'm selfish and want to keep reading a work this good.

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Chairman fluffles
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Post by Chairman fluffles »

Because I'm a tool, and you'll smite me if I don't :lol:

Seriously, you're a good artist - stop it!

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Pravus
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Post by Pravus »

Yeah, I agree with Yeahduff. It's probably the most real comic I've ever read, and I like how, even if you haven't met him or her, you'll probably meet one of those characters in real life. I also like how pessimistic it is. Things these days are too nice :twisted:
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DamnMyEyes
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Post by DamnMyEyes »

cuz it realistic.....most other comics are like fantasy or action or something. which is cool but not very many have that real world kinda view....awesome artwork...and it gives me something to do. :)
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TheSuburbanLetdown
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Post by TheSuburbanLetdown »

Chairman fluffles wrote:Because I'm a tool, and you'll smite me if I don't :lol:

Seriously, you're a good artist - stop it!
Oh, I never meant for this to be a hugfest or anything, but I appreciate the compliments. I really just wanted a status report of sorts to see why people are reading it. Also to find out what I'm doing right so I can keep doing it, and scrap what's not working or fix it. I know where all my flaws are, but I want to see if anyone notices them. And others may be noticing ones I'm not seeing. Luckily my future brother-in-law caught a bunch of things I was doing wrong, which is why there was a style change about 2 years ago.
Paul Escobar wrote:
Also, I like your art. There are sometimes some very minor issues with the characters' anatomy, but nothing that disturbs the reading. Your backgrounds and frame and page compositions are flawless and highly impressive. A lot of work went into these pages (three-point perspective hooray!), and it shows.
Thanks. And yeah. Anatomy is one of my weakest suits. We had life drawing for one semester at university once a week. I also didn't keep practicing like I shoulda been. I'd like to take more classes to brush up, especially since I can totally outdraw the old me that was in school now. He sucked.

Composition and framing are what take me the longest sometimes. I plan stuff out so that it makes sense and doesn't violate things like the 180º rule. I always tell myself that I shouldn't care so much, but I guess I do.
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Post by JTigerclaw »

I like the fact that there is someone out there as anal as me when it comes to composition, backgrounds and complicated artwork. ;)

I liked it for its story and characters and art before I knew who you were, and now I still like it for the same reasons even though I'm your friend. You put a great deal of effort into it and it shows, and as a result it looks awesome. :)

I can't really think of much that I'd change. I have no idea. Maybe the same problem as I have, which is the time it takes to do the art and the slow pacing of the story makes storylines last a good lot longer than maybe it should, but like I said I have that same problem. That's pretty much unavoidable when you put in 100% so you have great looking art and you don't get paid to do this 40-50 hours a week. I like the way the story proceeds though, so I wouldn't change a thing.
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PortableNuke
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Re: Why do you read The End of Things?

Post by PortableNuke »

theSuburbanLetdown wrote:Somtimes I wonder, why do any of you people read this comic? As in, what do you find good about it and what should I keep doing? What sucks about it and can be made better? Sometimes I don't even know why I keep drawing it.
It's a strong narrative. It has strong likable characters, and it has a nice dark edge to it that many stories lack. It's not a dark brooding edge like in Noir-ish stuff, it's a black humor edge.

I'd keep doing what you're doing. You have great vision about where the story is heading, and you are executing it very well. I like how everything escalates just a little bit more each time.

I like what you are doing, so I can't really say anything sucks. In the early strips, the dialog for the characters was fairly similar which kind of made them blend together, but you've since gotten a handle on that and created a unique voice for each character.

I can't help on the art, so I'll leave that to someone else.

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Pravus
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Post by Pravus »

I really like the way you do the expressions of the characters. For example, the comic you just put out, on panel three, I like how Evan has a little smirk there, like he said the last comment just to annoy the another guy, and he knows it works. It's stuff like that that I like.
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Redcrow
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Post by Redcrow »

I agree with just about everything posted above. As I am currently under the influence of cheap California Zinfandel, I will state my particular reasons anyway.

One: I like furry in general.

Two: I like graphic novels with some depth.

Three: I like slice-of-life better than the average fantasy or SF or Shonen graphic novels. Although it's a close run between excellent aforementioned and slice-of-file.

Four: You are a fellow cartoonist, therefor my inspiration.

Five: The forum is above and beyond what you find on a typical Shonen-ai forum, e.g.:

"OOO--you draw so awesome..i wihs i could draw!!!!!"

"I can't wait til you update!"

"That is so wrong!"

The fact that at least two people on the forum knew what the hell I was talking about when I posted about the Third Reich and Art impressed the hell out of me. I'm surprised that anybody under the age of 40 even gives a fuck.

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Re: Why do you read The End of Things?

Post by Hungrywolf »

PortableNuke wrote:It's a strong narrative. It has strong likable characters, and it has a nice dark edge to it that many stories lack. It's not a dark brooding edge like in Noir-ish stuff, it's a black humor edge.
I totally agree with that. You do an great job imo.

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ShannC
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Post by ShannC »

I second what was said about realism.

I also second Paul minus the small complaints(I didn't notice except for a brick wall somewhere that looked really off). Anyway, you've come miles with your drawing style so no worries.

I don't see any need in changing anything, anything you don't already see yourself. There's things I'm still waiting for to see however, but the comic isn't done so that's a stupid complaint.

Specifically, we aren't so well aquainted with Maynard. I don't understand him much other than he seems a bit aloof and unaffected by stuff. Flesh him out at some point. As I said, it's a dumb complaint 'cause it's not finished yet but I'm intrigued by the water gun hero. Controlled or just emotionally apathetic? Cool or the quite opposite? I hope he doesn't fall out of the story anyway.

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Post by Never Mayhem »

You can watch your art progress little by little over the years, plus it's unique, can be minimal or heavily detailed (like drawing every fuckin' brick on a restaurant). Mostly I'm drawn to the writing, as a lot of others have said, though. It's unapologetic and at times darkly comedic... plus I'm a sucker for angsty stuff, and there's plenty of that floating around. It's never tired, too, so it holds my interest, probably always will.
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Paul Escobar
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Post by Paul Escobar »

theSuburbanLetdown wrote:I plan stuff out so that it makes sense and doesn't violate things like the 180º rule. I always tell myself that I shouldn't care so much, but I guess I do.
Compromising what you think is necessary to make good piece of work is not a good idea. So thumbs up for caring to do proper planning. That's part of making a comic stand out, so from a reader's point of view, it's all good.

Though I never quite understood why the 180° rule is considered so important. I mean, yes, it makes sense and serves a good purpose most of the time; but if you've properly established the scene, I think you can have the camera do a 360° around people to good effect. (Not saying you should; just a general remark.)

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TheSuburbanLetdown
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Post by TheSuburbanLetdown »

Paul Escobar wrote:
theSuburbanLetdown wrote:I plan stuff out so that it makes sense and doesn't violate things like the 180º rule. I always tell myself that I shouldn't care so much, but I guess I do.
Compromising what you think is necessary to make good piece of work is not a good idea. So thumbs up for caring to do proper planning. That's part of making a comic stand out, so from a reader's point of view, it's all good.

Though I never quite understood why the 180° rule is considered so important. I mean, yes, it makes sense and serves a good purpose most of the time; but if you've properly established the scene, I think you can have the camera do a 360° around people to good effect. (Not saying you should; just a general remark.)
Yeah, rules can be broken for good effect, but I generally like to stick to it. Most of the time, I set up a neutral shot when I move the camera, but it didn't feel right in this scene. I didn't want the camera flying around too much in this scene. When I revisit this scene, I'm going have the camera mostly on the other side and probably move it around more.
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Bloodied Fox
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Post by Bloodied Fox »

Pardon the art newb question but what's the 180 degree rule?
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Pravus
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Post by Pravus »

From my guesses, I think it's that the "camera" i.e the angle of the scene doesn't go above a certain point, probably past the center....or not
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TheSuburbanLetdown
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Post by TheSuburbanLetdown »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/180_degree_rule

Sounds simple enough, but it becomes an issue the more complex the work is.
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